Most expensive Watch

A Rolex that once belonged to Paul Newman became the most expensive wristwatch ever sold in an auction as it fetched $17.8 million Thursday night in New York.
The stainless-steel Daytona Rolex was the star of a special 50-lot evening sale, “ Winning Icons — Legendary Watches of the 20th Century,” at Phillips auction house. The timepiece had been estimated at more than $1 million. The previous record for a wristwatch belonged to a stainless-steel Patek Philippe that sold for $11.1 million at Phillips in November.
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Now you can send receive money on messenger

Facebook and PayPal announced that they have added the latter as a funding source for P2P (peer-to-peer) payments in Messenger. If you’re using Facebook chat service, you’ll now have the options to send and request money using your PayPal account.
The new option is only available to customers in the United States starting today. However, since this is a staged roll-out, it might take up to a week for the new money service to be enabled for everyone.
In the same piece of news, PayPal announced that it has decided to introduce its first PayPal customers service bot for Messenger. Basically, this means that PayPal customers will be able to receive payment and account support directly in Messenger.
Of course, you will need a valid PayPal account in order to start sending money to your friends and family, or request funds for that matter.

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Live by greenery to extend your life

A new study suggests having daily exposure to trees and other greenery can extend your life.
Dan Crouse of the University of New Brunswick, along with other researchers across Canada and the United States, studied 1.3 million Canadians in 30 cities over an 11-year period.
“We found that those who have more trees and vegetation around where they lived had an eight to 12 per cent reduced risk of dying compared to those who didn’t,”